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February 2019

Jeri Smith-Cronin, ‘Chivalry, Religion, and Anglo-Spanish Diplomacy: Censoring Thomas Dekker’s The Whore of Babylon’ and Matthew Blaiden ‘John Lyly, Court Dramatist?’

28 February @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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This joint session will feature two third-year PhD students from the University of Leeds. Jeri Smith-Cronin will be talking to the title: 'Chivalry, Religion, and Anglo-Spanish Diplomacy: Censoring Thomas Dekker's The Whore of Babylon': In November 1619, the stand-in Spanish ambassador in London, Diego de la Fuente, intervened to prohibit a revival of Dekker’s 1606 play, The Whore of Babylon. Underlining the relationship between censorship and diplomatic exigency, this paper briefly explores how Dekker’s play could become sensitive again in…

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March 2019

Alvar Blomgren, ‘‘The cause of loyalty and love’: Political mobilisation and emotional practices in Nottingham during the 1790s’

21 March @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Jessop West Seminar Room 3

This paper examines royalist responses to the challenge of radicalism following the French revolution. In Nottingham, the Tory establishment saw themselves as threatened by the inflamed passions of the town’s working population, which – the Tories believed – caused them to turn away from the existing political order. In order to restore this lost social unity, I argue, the Tories used a range of emotional practices designed to modulate these troublesome emotions. Through a combination of charivari rituals, electoral practices,…

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April 2019

Thomas Whitfield, “Wilkes and Liberty” – Punch bowls and the later-eighteenth-century Wilkite agitations

4 April @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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Newcastle PhD Student Thomas Whitfield speaks on the topic of "Wilkes and Liberty". The consumption of alcohol is well recognised as being an important practice in the formation of community and in the assertion and negotiation of individual and group identity (Dietler 2006). This is particularly true in the context of the eighteenth century, when the techniques, technologies and practices of alcohol consumption grew to become more complex than in any previous period of history. Of particular note in eighteenth-century…

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