Reconstructing Archives with Tim Raylor

Tim Raylor with map of Hobbe's Peaks trip

The last of this season’s SCEMS Visiting Speakers was Tim Raylor, Professor of English at Carleton College, Minnesota. A literary scholar who has spent a career developing keen archival skills, our visitor used this occasion to share work-in-progress. Sheffield postgraduate (and Continue reading Reconstructing Archives with Tim Raylor

A masterclass in medical advertising: Emma Spary in Sheffield

Emma Spary mid-lecture, with slide defining "Drugs" in background.

On 20-21 October 2016, SCEMS welcomed Emma Spary, Reader in Modern European History at the University of Cambridge, as part of our Visiting Speaker Series. The visit, co-hosted by the Department of French, provided the occasion for an evening lecture Continue reading A masterclass in medical advertising: Emma Spary in Sheffield

Emma Spary: The ‘usual miracles of quinquina’: monarch, court and cure in France around 1700

Evening lecture from SCEMS Visiting Speaker Emma Spary.  Please note change of venue: This event will be held in the Diamond Lecture Theatre 6 (on the basement level), not Lecture Theatre 9 as previously advertised. Quinquina is one of several Continue reading Emma Spary: The ‘usual miracles of quinquina’: monarch, court and cure in France around 1700

How Markku Peltonen revisited England’s Revolution

Markku Peltonen mid-lecture

For our first visiting speaker of 2016–17, SCEMS was privileged to welcome Professor Markku Peltonen from the University of Helsinki, who (thanks to the generosity of the Humanities Research Institute) spent a week in Sheffield earlier this month. Best known Continue reading How Markku Peltonen revisited England’s Revolution

Masterclass with Markku Peltonen

Early-modern English history: a view from outside Masterclass with HRI Visiting European Fellow Markku Peltonen. Beginning with an extract on English “Government”, Visiting Speaker Markku Peltonen will lead this Friday morning session. Registration required. Limited spaces.

Seminar with Steve Hindle

What was Sir Richard Newdigate thinking in 1684?: A Warwickshire Gentleman and his Library Steve Hindle, social and economic historian of early modern England and Director of Research at The Huntington Library, will be leading a seminar in Sheffield as Continue reading Seminar with Steve Hindle

Lorna Hutson: Thinking with Causes: Henry V and Scotland

King Henry V in profile, by an unknown artist. Image from the National Portrait Gallery (NPG 545).

King Henry V. (NPG 545) Unknown artist, oil on panel, late 16th or early 17th century. Image from the National Portrait Gallery. Used here under Creative Commons License 3.0. Written at the time of the accession of a Scots king Continue reading Lorna Hutson: Thinking with Causes: Henry V and Scotland

SCEMS Masterclass: Robert Tittler

Seeking the Local and the Visual: Wanderings through Post-Reformation England. The third in the Autumn 2015 series of Masterclasses will be delivered by Robert Tittler, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Concordia University. Professor Tittler characterises his career as unconventional. This Continue reading SCEMS Masterclass: Robert Tittler

Robert Tittler: Social Aspiration and Experiments in English Portraiture, c. 1560-1620

Robert Tittler, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History (Concordia University) is a specialist in early modern English history.  His work has moved progressively through political, social, economic, local/urban and cultural enquiries, focusing on the period to 1640. Having started out with Continue reading Robert Tittler: Social Aspiration and Experiments in English Portraiture, c. 1560-1620

Naomi Tadmor: The Settlement of the Poor and the Rise of the Form

Professor Naomi Tadmor (Lancaster University) is a historian with strong interdisciplinary research interests. She has published on the history of the family and community relations, history and literature, and the social and cultural history of the English Bible from the early Continue reading Naomi Tadmor: The Settlement of the Poor and the Rise of the Form