Alex Taylor, Tobaccomania: the mass-consumption of tobacco in seventeenth-century England

For the final EMF this semester, we welcome Alex Taylor (PhD candidate in History). Alex will focus on a sixty year period (1625-1685) in which tobacco was transformed into a cheap and widely available commodity, the first of the so-called Continue reading Alex Taylor, Tobaccomania: the mass-consumption of tobacco in seventeenth-century England

Gary Rivett, Information, surveillance and parliamentary governance during the English Civil Wars

Sometime between 1645 and 1649, William Lenthall, the speaker of the House of Commons, wrote to the Wiltshire County Commissioners stating that the House had received ‘intelligence from severall parts of the kingdome’ about the designs of its enemies. To Continue reading Gary Rivett, Information, surveillance and parliamentary governance during the English Civil Wars

Apurbaa Chatterjee, Nature in the Culture of Empire: Showcasing Early British India

For this EMF, we welcome History PhD student Apurbaa Chatterjee. She will deal with the visual representations of Indian flora and fauna during early British rule, around 1760 to 1820. In doing so, her talk situates nature within imperial politics and Continue reading Apurbaa Chatterjee, Nature in the Culture of Empire: Showcasing Early British India

Heather Dalton, ‘When forsaken by my relations’: The Skinner Family

Dr Heather Dalton is a Research Fellow in the School of Historical & Philosophical Studies at the University of Melbourne. The focus of her current project is transnational relationships and family ties in trading networks in the 15th and 16th Continue reading Heather Dalton, ‘When forsaken by my relations’: The Skinner Family

500 Reformations

As the closest EMF to the iconic Luther anniversary, volunteers from Sheffield’s 500 Reformations project are putting on a fun intramural event to introduce the project and mark the quincentenary. This will include an opportunity for those with experience of Continue reading 500 Reformations

Thomas Rose – ‘The Socio-Politics of Hunting in Early Stuart England: three case studies from the Midlands’

A PhD student at Nottingham University, Thomas Rose will be presenting his research on the socio-politics of hunting in early Stuart England, through three case studies from the East Midlands: Jacobean royal progresses, a gentry hunting network, and aristocratic gifting Continue reading Thomas Rose – ‘The Socio-Politics of Hunting in Early Stuart England: three case studies from the Midlands’

What were they thinking? The challenges of academic book reviews

This session is intended as a development activity for postgraduates and early career researchers. Combining insight into published book reviews and anecdotes about the writing process with pragmatic advice, this session will examine the role of book reviews as a Continue reading What were they thinking? The challenges of academic book reviews

Mabel Winter, ‘they are not so powerful as they made themselves’: Politics, power, and business in seventeenth-century England

This week we welcome Mabel Winter, a PhD student in History, who will explore the intimate relationship between politics, power and business through the case study of the Bank of Woollchurch Market (1670-1677). Whilst trade was growing at a monumental rate in Continue reading Mabel Winter, ‘they are not so powerful as they made themselves’: Politics, power, and business in seventeenth-century England

Stephen Basdeo: “The Rogue and the Outlaw: Towards a Cultural History of the Early Modern Underworld”

This Thursday lunchtime programme coordinated jointly by the postgraduate-run Early Modern Discussion Group and SCEMS welcomes Stephen Basdeo, PhD candidate at Leeds Trinity University. The poem A Gest of Robyn Hode dates from the fifteenth century. It was not printed, Continue reading Stephen Basdeo: “The Rogue and the Outlaw: Towards a Cultural History of the Early Modern Underworld”

‘Order and Disorder in the Early Modern Book’ with Catherine Evans and Alison Horgan

This EMF is jointly organised with Book History. It will feature 2 current PhD students from the School of English.