Thomas Rose – ‘The Socio-Politics of Hunting in Early Stuart England: three case studies from the Midlands’

A PhD student at Nottingham University, Thomas Rose will be presenting his research on the socio-politics of hunting in early Stuart England, through three case studies from the East Midlands: Jacobean royal progresses, a gentry hunting network, and aristocratic gifting Continue reading Thomas Rose – ‘The Socio-Politics of Hunting in Early Stuart England: three case studies from the Midlands’

Mabel Winter, ‘they are not so powerful as they made themselves’: Politics, power, and business in seventeenth-century England

This week we welcome Mabel Winter, a PhD student in History, who will explore the intimate relationship between politics, power and business through the case study of the Bank of Woollchurch Market (1670-1677). Whilst trade was growing at a monumental rate in Continue reading Mabel Winter, ‘they are not so powerful as they made themselves’: Politics, power, and business in seventeenth-century England

SCEMS Research Project Day

On Wednesday 7 June we will be running a ‘SCEMS research projects day’, which will provide an opportunity for colleagues to hear about early modern research projects in development, and also some which are in progress. We have a number Continue reading SCEMS Research Project Day

Sonia Tycko – “Coercion and Consent in Early Modern English Military Impressment”

The Thursday lunchtime programme coordinated jointly by the postgraduate-run Early Modern Discussion Group and SCEMS, welcomes Sonia Tycko, PhD candidate at Harvard University and visiting student at Cambridge University. The drama of selecting men to be common soldiers for late Continue reading Sonia Tycko – “Coercion and Consent in Early Modern English Military Impressment”

David Coast: ‘Speaking for the People in Early Modern England’

This paper examines the authority of what might loosely be called “public opinion” in political and religious polemics in England from c. 1529 – 1640. One important strand of elite political rhetoric portrayed the common people as an ignorant and Continue reading David Coast: ‘Speaking for the People in Early Modern England’

Many Worlds of Eighteenth-Century Britain: Apurba Chatterjee reports from the #EMForum

On 12 May 2016, the Early Modern Discussion Group welcomed two Sheffield-based eighteenth-century researchers with a shared interest in masculinities, Kate Gibson and Lauren Nixon. Session Chair Apurba Chatterjee (a first-year PhD student in History) reports:

EMDG: Adrian Green, ‘Boynton Hall, East Yorkshire: Cultural change in a gentry house and landscape, c.1450–1800’

Please note this session of the Early Modern Forum will begin at the later time of 1pm. The Early Modern Discussion Group is delighted to have persuaded Dr Adrian Green (Durham University) to share insights arising from his co-authored study Continue reading EMDG: Adrian Green, ‘Boynton Hall, East Yorkshire: Cultural change in a gentry house and landscape, c.1450–1800’

EMDG: Nigel Cavanagh: Elsecar: Lordship and Community in a Georgian Industrial Village 1750-1860

Nigel Cavanagh first studied at the University of Sheffield from 1993 to 1998, gaining a BA (Hons) in Archaeology, Prehistory and Medieval History and a Master’s Degree with Distinction in Historical Archaeology. He went on to pursue a successful career Continue reading EMDG: Nigel Cavanagh: Elsecar: Lordship and Community in a Georgian Industrial Village 1750-1860

EMDG: Sarah Ward, ‘“The Beare in the Cage”: Royalism, Religion and the Gentry of North-East Wales 1646-1660’

PLEASE NOTE CHANGE OF DATE AND VENUE. Sarah Ward, Oxford DPhil student and this year’s RHS Centenary Fellow will be presenting research on royalism, religion and revolution in seventeenth-century Wales, as a guest of the Early Modern Discussion Group. Read more Continue reading EMDG: Sarah Ward, ‘“The Beare in the Cage”: Royalism, Religion and the Gentry of North-East Wales 1646-1660’

EMDG, speaker tbc

  This event is organised by the Early Modern Discussion Group, and is part of the Early Modern Forum lunchtime series.