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October 2018

Samantha Chang, Framing the Scene in the Seventeenth Century: Doors and Doorways in the Painter’s Studio

11 October, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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Doors and doorways orchestrate our movements and act as thresholds of constructed realities. Doorways are liminal spaces between representation and reality; they are “nonplaces” that allow the viewers to ploeghen (plunge) from the field of the beholder and insien (view into) or doorsien (view through) the fictive space of the painting. The term doorsien can be found in Karel van Mander’s 1604 publication, Het schilder-boeck (The Painter’s Book). The doorsien treatment is generally characterized by a doorway opening into a corridor,…

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Tom Leng, Disorderly Brethren: The Fellowship of Merchant Adventurers and the Restructuring of Anglo-European Commerce, 1582-1689

18 October, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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This talk will discuss the development of Dr Tom Leng's (History) current book project, on the merchant company known as the Fellowship of Merchant Adventurers during its last century as a privileged institution. He will discuss how and why he came to be interested in this subject, how he has sought to approach it, and some of his conclusions about the importance of this particular trading company to the larger changes that England's overseas trade underwent in this period.

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November 2018

Daniel Cadman, Disgrace me on the open stage and bob me off with ne’er a penny’: The Hog Hath Lost his Pearl and Commercial Metatheatre

15 November, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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Robert Tailor’s play, The Hog Hath Lost His Pearl, was first performed in 1613 at the Whitefriars playhouse by the London Apprentices. It consists of two plots, one of which follows the conventions of the city comedy and focuses upon the efforts to thwart a merciless usurer (the eponymous Hog), whilst the other is closer to romantic tragicomedy in focusing upon the love rivalry between two former friends. Some commentators have attempted to explain the yoking of the two largely…

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Karlijn Luk, The Politics of Moffenkluchten: Humour strategies in the imaging of German immigrants in early modern Dutch Farces

29 November, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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During the early modern period, the Dutch Republic, and Amsterdam in particular, was a hub of all sorts of migrants. Among them was a significant group of German immigrants that became the object of ridicule in a highly popular subgenre of early modern Dutch Farce: The Moffenklucht. The continuous mocking and stereotyping of German immigrants in this collection of comic plays has thus far been framed as innocent entertainment and a form of comic relief. Using recent theories from the…

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December 2018

Igor Fedyukin, Assessing the effectiveness of early modern bureaucracy: The case of the Chancellery of Confiscations in Russia, 1730s

6 December, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
38 Mappin Street, Classroom 8

State-building and the expansion of the ever more effective bureaucracy is supposed to be one of the central features of the early modern era in Europe. However, how do we actually assess the workings of these bureaucracies to move beyond judgements based on impressionistic and even anecdotal data? This paper uses a case study of one particular institution in Russia in the 1730s  - a polity notorious for its ineffective and cumbersome bureaucracy - to offer some refections on this…

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Micheal Bennett, Plantation Slavery and the Seventeenth-Century English East India Company

13 December, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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In the 1680s the English East India Company sought to establish a plantation economy on its small and isolated South Atlantic colony of St. Helena. The Barbados sugar industry, which had brought great wealth to English planters and merchants extraordinarily quickly, served as a model for the company. In the second half of the seventeenth century numerous merchants who served on the East India Company’s court of committees also had business interests in the West Indies, accounting for why Barbados…

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February 2019

Claudia Rogers, ‘A Table for Two: the rise and fall of Guacanagarí and Columbus’ relationship, 1492-3′

14 February @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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This talk will focus on the turbulent relationship between the Taíno cacique Guacanagarí and Christopher Columbus, and the mysterious events surrounding the fall of La Navidad (the first Christian settlement in the New World). The talk will highlight Guacanagarí's agency during the Taínos' encounter with Columbus, and reflect on how we can read for indigenous power in the surviving, European-authored accounts. All welcome!

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Dr Kate Davison, ‘Satire and Public Politics in Eighteenth-Century Britain’

21 February @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Jessop West Seminar Room 3

Against the backdrop of an expanding print industry and growing market for political news and commentary, Eighteenth-Century Britain was awash with satirical images and texts that spread political debate beyond the corridors of power. What was their impact? No satire ever led to the fall of ministers or monarchs, but rather than conclude that satire was therefore ineffective, this paper argues that its impact was more subtle: by providing a running critical commentary on political affairs, satire opened up space…

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May 2019

Annaliese Connolly | ‘Helen’s Song in George Peele’s The Arraignment of Paris’

9 May @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Jessop West Seminar Room 3

This event has been cancelled due to illness.

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November 2019

Cora James and Andrea Paquin – Early Modern Drama

7 November @ 1:05 pm - 2:00 pm
9 Mappin Street G03, 9 Mappin Street
Sheffield, S1 4DT
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Cora James (Sheffield) and Andrea Paquin (York) will be presenting work derived from their PhD research. Cora James is researching the creative input of actresses into Restoration drama, and Andrea Paquin works on early modern boy players.

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