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February 2018

Tom Rutter, Ben Jonson and the Cavendishes

15 February, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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For the first EMF this semester, our very own Tom Rutter (English) will present on Jonson's professional and personal relationship with William Cavendish, Earl of Newcastle, including his commissioned poems and entertainments, plays written under Cavendish's influence, and Jonson's stay at Welbeck during his 1618 walk to Scotland. Listeners can expect centaurs, cheese-mites, an incontinent midwife, and Robin Hood to boot. All welcome! This session is organised by the EMDG.

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March 2018

Sam Fullerton – Rethinking Royalist Sexual Libel, 1642-6

29 March, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

PhD candidate from the University of California Riverside, Samuel Fullerton, will be speaking to the title 'Rethinking Royalist Sexual Libel, 1642-6': Although vicious sexual slander has been recognized by many scholars as perhaps the most distinctive element of 1640s royalist print polemic, especially during the Second Civil War of 1648, its origins have never been studied in detail.  This paper examines the development of sexual rhetoric in Cavalier print culture during the early-to-mid 1640s to argue that the association between…

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May 2018

Cait Scott and Sam Bromage – Archaeology and the Dissolution of the Monasteries

3 May, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

PhD candidates Cait Scott and Sam Bromage from the Department of Archaeology will be discussing their research on the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The Dissolution of the Monasteries had a dramatic effect on England's religious, social, and economic landscape. From the north to south, from urban towns to rural spaces, the disbanding of once powerful monastic houses and the transfer of their property to secular owners irrevocably changed the make-up of our society. Archaeology as a discipline provides a range…

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October 2018

Samantha Chang, Framing the Scene in the Seventeenth Century: Doors and Doorways in the Painter’s Studio

11 October, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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Doors and doorways orchestrate our movements and act as thresholds of constructed realities. Doorways are liminal spaces between representation and reality; they are “nonplaces” that allow the viewers to ploeghen (plunge) from the field of the beholder and insien (view into) or doorsien (view through) the fictive space of the painting. The term doorsien can be found in Karel van Mander’s 1604 publication, Het schilder-boeck (The Painter’s Book). The doorsien treatment is generally characterized by a doorway opening into a corridor,…

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November 2018

Karlijn Luk, The Politics of Moffenkluchten: Humour strategies in the imaging of German immigrants in early modern Dutch Farces

29 November, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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During the early modern period, the Dutch Republic, and Amsterdam in particular, was a hub of all sorts of migrants. Among them was a significant group of German immigrants that became the object of ridicule in a highly popular subgenre of early modern Dutch Farce: The Moffenklucht. The continuous mocking and stereotyping of German immigrants in this collection of comic plays has thus far been framed as innocent entertainment and a form of comic relief. Using recent theories from the…

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December 2018

Micheal Bennett, Plantation Slavery and the Seventeenth-Century English East India Company

13 December, 2018 @ 1:05 pm - 1:50 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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In the 1680s the English East India Company sought to establish a plantation economy on its small and isolated South Atlantic colony of St. Helena. The Barbados sugar industry, which had brought great wealth to English planters and merchants extraordinarily quickly, served as a model for the company. In the second half of the seventeenth century numerous merchants who served on the East India Company’s court of committees also had business interests in the West Indies, accounting for why Barbados…

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February 2019

Jeri Smith-Cronin, ‘Chivalry, Religion, and Anglo-Spanish Diplomacy: Censoring Thomas Dekker’s The Whore of Babylon’ and Matthew Blaiden ‘John Lyly, Court Dramatist?’

28 February @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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This joint session will feature two third-year PhD students from the University of Leeds. Jeri Smith-Cronin will be talking to the title: 'Chivalry, Religion, and Anglo-Spanish Diplomacy: Censoring Thomas Dekker's The Whore of Babylon': In November 1619, the stand-in Spanish ambassador in London, Diego de la Fuente, intervened to prohibit a revival of Dekker’s 1606 play, The Whore of Babylon. Underlining the relationship between censorship and diplomatic exigency, this paper briefly explores how Dekker’s play could become sensitive again in…

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March 2019

Alvar Blomgren, ‘‘The cause of loyalty and love’: Political mobilisation and emotional practices in Nottingham during the 1790s’

21 March @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Jessop West Seminar Room 3

This paper examines royalist responses to the challenge of radicalism following the French revolution. In Nottingham, the Tory establishment saw themselves as threatened by the inflamed passions of the town’s working population, which – the Tories believed – caused them to turn away from the existing political order. In order to restore this lost social unity, I argue, the Tories used a range of emotional practices designed to modulate these troublesome emotions. Through a combination of charivari rituals, electoral practices,…

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Rachel Small, ‘Putting the humor back into early modern food studies’

28 March @ 1:05 pm - 2:00 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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Univeristy of Leicester PhD student Rachel Small talks to the title: 'Putting the humor back into early modern food studies' Archaeological studies of food have generally taken an isolationist approach: they have tended to consider animal and plant remains separately and have largely failed to integrate written sources. Furthermore, interpretations have tended to focus on economics or on identifying aspects of identity (most commonly social status). A major omission has been that evidence has seldom been interpreted within the ontological…

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April 2019

Thomas Whitfield, “Wilkes and Liberty” – Punch bowls and the later-eighteenth-century Wilkite agitations

4 April @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Humanities Research Institute, 34 Gell Street
Sheffield, S3 7QY United Kingdom
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Newcastle PhD Student Thomas Whitfield speaks on the topic of "Wilkes and Liberty". The consumption of alcohol is well recognised as being an important practice in the formation of community and in the assertion and negotiation of individual and group identity (Dietler 2006). This is particularly true in the context of the eighteenth century, when the techniques, technologies and practices of alcohol consumption grew to become more complex than in any previous period of history. Of particular note in eighteenth-century…

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