New book announcement! Volcanoes in Eighteenth-Century Europe

David McCallam, Reader in French Eighteenth-Century Studies at the University of Sheffield, has just released his new book: Volcanoes in Eighteenth-Century Europe: An Essay in Environmental Humanities Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment This study explores the explosive history of Continue reading New book announcement! Volcanoes in Eighteenth-Century Europe

A masterclass in medical advertising: Emma Spary in Sheffield

Emma Spary mid-lecture, with slide defining "Drugs" in background.

On 20-21 October 2016, SCEMS welcomed Emma Spary, Reader in Modern European History at the University of Cambridge, as part of our Visiting Speaker Series. The visit, co-hosted by the Department of French, provided the occasion for an evening lecture Continue reading A masterclass in medical advertising: Emma Spary in Sheffield

Blogging Utopia (7): Greek Books

In our latest post, guest blogger Carla Suthren looks at the way in which Hythloday’s Greek library and his efforts to teach the Utopians Greek highlight the ‘serious playfulness’ of More’s Utopia.  

Blogging Utopia (5): Arriving in Utopia

After the dialogue of Book 1 of More’s Utopia, we come to the discourse of Book 2, in which Hythloday relates his impressions of Utopia. In this fifth post, Chloë Houston explores the opening of Book 2 and the way Continue reading Blogging Utopia (5): Arriving in Utopia

#EMForum commentary: Rachael Morton (University of Warwick)

Commentary by Tom Rusbridge, PhD student in the Department of History On May 5th the Early Modern Discussion Group welcomed Rachael Morton from the University of Warwick, where she is a third year PhD in the Department of History. Morton’s Continue reading #EMForum commentary: Rachael Morton (University of Warwick)

Blogging Utopia (4): Man-eating sheep

In this post, Cathy Shrank looks at one of the most memorable passages of More’s Utopia: Hythloday’s attack on the contemporary practice of enclosing land for sheep-farming and his analysis of its far-reaching effects.  

When Uppsala came to stay: #emUUShef Workshop Commentary by Apurba Chatterjee and Tom Rusbridge

Apurba Chatterjee and Tom Rusbridge are first year PhD students in the Department of History. Both attended the workshop and ate the biscuits.   On March 10th and 11th SCEMS hosted a joint workshop with the Research Node in Early Modern Continue reading When Uppsala came to stay: #emUUShef Workshop Commentary by Apurba Chatterjee and Tom Rusbridge

Bacchus in Boston: Intoxicants and Early Modernity at #RenSA16

Easter offers a break from teaching schedules, and the opportunity for SCEMS members to travel and share their research further afield. This week, the Social History Society gathering in Lancaster heard from Sheffield early modernists including Kate Gibson (on illegitimate Continue reading Bacchus in Boston: Intoxicants and Early Modernity at #RenSA16

Hope in memory of Blake: 30 April 2015

“Edgelands, Flatlands: spaces, data, language, and literature” The Norman Blake Memorial Lecture 2015. Professor Jonathan Hope (Strathclyde)   Norman Francis Blake (1934-2012) was a historian of medieval literature and language, a scholar whose work ‘can scarcely be matched in its Continue reading Hope in memory of Blake: 30 April 2015

Coffee, Culture and Conversation in the Eighteenth Century

SCEMS’ Dr Adam James Smith has news about an unanticipated collaboration prompted by his short film, The Coffee House. Adam writes: We owe an awful lot to the eighteenth century. The eighteenth century saw Britain embrace an abundance of commodities and Continue reading Coffee, Culture and Conversation in the Eighteenth Century